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Is the Pythagorean theorem really the Baudhayana formula?  Meruprastara may be what we know today as Pascal's triangle. The mathematics we work with may not be from ancient Greece, but from Hindu civilization. Yet Indians were taught by British colonists that they were a backward people.  Two Indians discuss a history that has been kept out of Western "knowledge" and has been hidden from them as well. 

Bhaskar Kamble is the author of The Imperishable Seed: How Hindu mathematics changed the world and why this history was erased. The Indian mathemeticians Pingala, Hemachandra, Bhaskara and Madhava may have been the true originators of algebra, trigonometry and calculus. The Catholic Church needed solutions to certain problems its expansionist aims had encountered, and these were discovered at the Kerala school of mathematics and astronomy. How many people know that Fibonacci (real name Leonardo Bonacci) introduced the Hindu number system to Europe in 1202...?

From the introduction:  I was to learn that even calculus, the most prized possession of European mathematics, first made its appearance in Kerala [India] four centuries before its appearance in Europe. But what really turned all my notions upside down was when I read Professor C.K. Raju's thoroughly researched articles on how knowledge of calculus was transmitted to Europe via Jesuit missionaries stationed in Kerala. It was clear that something major was amiss in how the history of mathematics is understood and presented today.  Read more here.

A much easier interview to follow: